Rosemary Essential Oil

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drbekhradi
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Feb 05, 2007 10:04 am

Rosemary Essential Oil

Post by drbekhradi » Mon Aug 18, 2008 4:43 am

Botanical Name: Rosmarinus officinalis

Description: An aromatic shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis has scaly bark and dense, leathery needlelike leaves. Tiny pale blue blossoms abound from December through spring. Rosemary can grow to heights of five to six feet (close to 2 meters) in height.

Common Method of Extraction: Steam Distilled

Color: Clear

Consistency: Thin

Perfumery Note: Middle -top

Strength of Initial Aroma: Medium - Strong

Blending Factor:2 to 3

Blends well with: Rosemary blends well with most oils, but particularly with basil, cedarwood, frankincense, ginger, grapefruit, orange and peppermint

Possible Uses: Aching muscles, arthritis, dandruff, dull skin, exhaustion, gout, hair care, muscle cramping, neuralgia, poor circulation, rheumatism. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.]

Constituents: Cineole, Pinene, Borneol, Linalol, Alpha-Terpineol, Terpinen-4-ol, Bornyl Acetate, Camphor, Thujone, Camphene, Limonene, Beta-Caryophyllene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Safety Information: Neurotoxic (toxic to the nerves). Avoid in pregnancy. Avoid in epilepsy, fever (no essential oil should be taken internally without the guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner). [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 165.]

Avoid in cases of hypertension. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 209.]

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